Search your favorite song for free

1. Analog Africa Selection Vol.5 (2014) by Déni Shain | Past & Future Analog Africa Tracks

Analog Africa Selection Vol.5 (2014) by Déni Shain | Past & Future Analog Africa Tracks

Download it, Share it, Forward it.... Thank you for the love and support!! A bit more then a year ago I received a message from Déni Shain, a french music producer based in Lisbon. In that mail he asked me if I would be interested in releasing music from Cabo Verde since he was close to Chico and Wilson, the 2 DJs behind Celeste Mariposa (an excellent portuguese/angolan soundsystem specialised in lusophone music). 'I can convince them to make their record collection available to you' he added. I asked him if he could send me a selection, not knowing the amount of work my request would represent. I only later found out that the three-men-team had spent a whole week to pick and choose what they thought was adequate and another few days to wash the record and digitise the music. I received that selection in March 2013 and I haven't stopped listening to it since. I clearly remember having that wonderful feeling when songs keep growing on you the more you listen. 'Very good sign' I thought! The collection of songs I had received became the base for a whole concept and we all started criss crossing Europe and Cabo Verde looking for more music and looking for the Cap-Verdien artists we loved. Déni Shain became an important asset for the Analog Africa label, supporting us with remixes and mixes but more importantly with an addictive positive energy. After his first mix for us, the amazing 'Ghana Soundtrack' made out of unreleased and rare tracks from the small west african musical powerhouse, here is his second instalment made of handpicked dancefloor filler. A huge shout goes to legendary african music connoisseur John Beatle, to Carlo Xavier for letting us use his fantastic edit of "O Anel" and to my close friend Keith Slater for offering us some of the fantastic music included here. Tracklisting : 01. Vincent Ahehehinnou & Orchestre Poly-Rythmo - Yeye We Nou Mi (from 'The 1st Album' LP, 1973 / Analog Africa reissue 2011) 02. Iftin Band - Haka Yeelin Nacabkeenna (from 'Gabar ii Noquee' tape, 1980s / special thanks to John Beadle) 03. Solo Hit - Imoikeme (from 'Imoikeme' 7 inch, 2013 reissue / Analog Africa) 04. N’Draman Blintch - I First U Last (from 'Cosmic Sounds' LP, 1980 / Cosmic Sounds) 05. Dina Santos - O Anel (Carlo Xavier Edit) (from 'In London' LP, 1983 / Dacapo) 06. Victor Uwaifo And The Titibitis - Ohue (From 'I Wanna Be Your No.1', 1980s / Taretone) 07. África Negra - Carambola (from 'Africa Negra 83' LP, 1983 / IEFE) 08. Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou - Moulon Devia (from 'Réveil Disco Dubain' LP, available soon on a forthcoming Analog Africa release) 09. Ondeno - Mayolye (from 'Ondeno' LP, 1980 / Disque Ledoux - Special thanks to Keith Slater) Total time : 37mn 35s

nothing at of , which is


2. Analog Africa Selection Vol.4 (2014) I Ghana Soundtrack - Previously unreleased & Obscure tracks

Analog Africa Selection Vol.4 (2014) I Ghana Soundtrack  - Previously unreleased & Obscure tracks

Fantastic mix made by my friend DJ/Producer Déni Shain, currently based in Mexico....spreading good vibes and excellent music. The songs used here were taken mainly from mastertapes found in Ghana, the others were recorded from obscure vinyls. Needless to say that half of these songs have never been heard before....feel free to download it, share it, play it...just funk it up !!!!! Enjoy it and spread the word !! ps: Abraços and big love to Brasil...Saudades !!!

nothing at of , which is


3. Analog Africa Selection Vol.3 (2013) Download it, Share it, forward it

Analog Africa Selection Vol.3 (2013) Download it, Share it, forward it

No mastering, no restoration......Raw in your face! Enjoy the impact !! (Share with friends, spread the word, forward to loved ones, download to your ipod .......enjoy !!! )

nothing at of , which is


4. Ecoute ma Melodie - Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou

Ecoute ma Melodie - Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou

Available on Analog Africa No.13 - The Skeletal Essences of Afro Funk Release date: April 30th

nothing at of , which is


5. Analog Africa Selection Vol.6 (2017) - 10 Years Anniversary Mix - Download and Share it !!!

Analog Africa Selection Vol.6 (2017) - 10 Years Anniversary Mix - Download and Share it !!!

From Cosmic Cabo Verde to synth-reggae at the Horn of Africa. (Special Mix for Vinyl Factory) Frankfurt-based label Analog Africa is easily one of the most noteworthy labels rescuing and reissuing Afro sounds. In 2015, the label gave us an exceptional anthology of Afro-Cuban pioneer Amara Touré, not to mention a compilation of tracks plucked straight from the dance floors of ’70s Senegal. Last year, they blew our human minds with some of the most extraterrestrial synth music we’ve ever heard on Space Echo. This year, the label turns ten. To celebrate label boss Samy Ben Redjeb and his DJ partner Pedo Knopp have recorded a special mix which we’re delighted to share here. “What is special about this mix is the fact that all the songs, except one, will be released on Analog Africa in 2017,” says Samy. “They have all been handpicked by myself and mixed in real time, without loops or any other kind of gimmicks by Pedo.” It’s a synth-ridden journey from reggae in the Horn of African to Cosmic sounds of Cabo Verde, wavey soca-boogie monsters and other proto-electronic Afro jams.

nothing at of , which is


6. Lamento Cubano - Amara Touré

Lamento Cubano - Amara Touré

The enigmatic Amara Touré from Guinée Conakry finally getting a well deserved compilation showcasing all of the 10 songs ever released between 1973 and 1980. Cuban influenced music of a different kind featuring amazing spaced-out guitar works!! Stay tuned for some of the most beautiful music ever recorded !! Release Date: Last week of May!

nothing at of , which is


7. FATIMITA - Urbano de Castro

FATIMITA - Urbano de Castro

Analog Africa No.15 – ANGOLA SOUNDTRACK 2 *Hypnosis, Distortions & Other Sonic Innovations 1969-1978* Catalogue No. AACD 075 (1xCD)/AALP 075 (2xLP) CD with 44-Page Booklet / LP with 16-Page LP Size Booklet In 2010, against all odds, Angola Soundtrack Vol.1 was awarded the German Record Critics’ Prize in the category "Black music". This victory was all the sweeter for its triumph over the predicted winner, Aloe Blacc´s multi platinium record, "Good Things". Many were surprised that the award was handed to a compilation that covered obscure music, but it didn’t surprise the team behind Analog Africa who believed such award should have come much earlier. Since discovering the music of Angola 15 years ago, styles such Kazucuta, Rebita and Semba have become an addiction for Samy Ben Redjeb, the compiler, who proclaimed a serious warning in the first edition liner notes: "Listening to these tracks may cause addiction and provoke heavy rotation!" The unique blend of incomparable musicianship, passionate delivery and regional rhythms that make these tracks so combustible are no accident. An exceptional set of circumstances existed in the history of Angola before Independence that created the giant leap in the style and standard of bands and recordings of the time. When Portuguese repressive measures prevented the small Turmas, street musician groups, from being able to perform in Carnaval celebrations in 1961, a Portuguese civil servant, entrepreneur and Angolan music fan named Luis Montês was already in a position to capitalise on Luanda’s need for a live music scene. His self-designed “Kutonocas”, Sunday afternoon live music festivals, delighted a Luandan population hungry for a communication between the city and musseques (townships). It also forced groups to adapt to a different style of playing that would accommodate large stages and broader audiences. They equipped themselves with electric guitars, and fed on the musical influences from Cape Verde, Congo and the Dominican Republic, while staying patriotically true to their own musical legacy and unique rhythms. The intimacy of those participating in this musical revolution meant they playfully and professionally wanted to trump each other’s style; communication between the groups was frequent as everyone studied each other’s records and concerts and players were under a lot of pressure to outdo each other due to the limited recording and performing opportunities. Development of skill and ingenuity was a must, as well as addressing the highly politicised climate. The optimism of Independence can be heard in these recordings; a common goal between the audience and musicians. Upon reading the characteristically generous liner notes of this new Analog Africa release, you will be given more hints of the crucial melting pot that allowed this short period to have such an outstanding productivity. Featuring 44 pages acquired in coordination with the National Library of Luanda and the art magazine “Note E Dia”, Analog Africa head honcho Samy Ben Redjeb has managed to collect newspaper clips, extremely rare pictures of the bands on stage and printed interviews from the 70s. The stunning pages of passionate photography and artistic design also include interviews with many of the original artists and their families, biographies of the three labels that made it all possible, and of Luis Montês, who was the pulse of the live music scene in Luanda. This compilation represents the best of the short lived recording industry in Angola, a brief moment of history between 1969 and 1978, when three recording companies produced approximately 800 limited records, mostly singles. They are rare jewels, each song with a significant story and feel behind it. You will hear exciting music blazed with the anticipation of emancipation, tracks fuelled with a sense of unity, community, importance and immediacy. This addictive, outlawed music from Angola shakes and grooves with the smoothness of staccato machine gun fire. Do yourself a favor and submerge yourself into some of the most the addictive music created by mankind!

nothing at of , which is


8. Bassala Hot - Verckys et l´Orchestre Vévé

Bassala Hot - Verckys et l´Orchestre Vévé

Release date 02.12.2014 "On his visit to Kinshasa James Brown dubbed him *Mister Dynamite*" It has been a struggle to lay hands on Verckys, although the man doesn´t go unnoticed. Notorious for being one of Congo´s most ruthless business men, the legendary musician had build a whole imperium in Kinshasa, the capital city of the central african power house (arguably one of the toughest places in the world) and has a whole building with his name, in the very heart of the city. So I travelled to the Congo in June of 2013 to find Verckys only to find out that he headed in opposite direction to sort out his health issues. But I did meet his manager who gave me his phone number, so I called:
 "Oh Monsieur Samy, we need to met, lets talk business", he said, probably not knowing that I was an independent record label, with all it represents. 
But the more I spoke to the men the more I realised that he was genuinely interested in music more then anything else. The following message I received few weeks ago, confirmed my feeling: "Samy, I am writing to you because I´m a little worried. I´ve been thinking about your selection and I now wonder if your compilation will do well due to the fact that the chosen songs had little impact in Kinshasa. Others had much more success" I was surprised but pleased to see that he cared about the project although I had already paid him in full. But why wouldn't he? Its his music after all. "Most of the songs you´ve selected were recorded in Nairobi, for the Kenyan market. These songs did very well there, also in Zambia, but here in the Congo they flopped...except for "Ya Nini", that was a monster hit. Still, I am very surprised you´ve mentioned it has become a legendary track in Colombia, positively surprised" This compilation was supposed to be released in October as a limited edition of 2000 copies, but after a few Skype chats with Verckys, seeing that he has come to terms with his health issues, and pushing for a European tour come next summer, we´ve decided to release this as Analog Africa No.17 which is now going to see light of day first week of December. In the mean time enjoy this imperial slice of Congolese Afrobeat. "Bassala Hot" is doomed to 
cast a spell on each and every dancefloor that dares to spin its bewitching sound. Beware!!! Thank you for reading.
Samy (Analog Africa)

nothing at of , which is


9. Cheka Sana - Verckys & Orchestre Vévé - Analog Africa No.17 (Please leave a comment for Verckys)

Cheka Sana - Verckys & Orchestre Vévé - Analog Africa No.17 (Please leave a comment for Verckys)

Release date 02.12.2014 "On his visit to Kinshasa James Brown dubbed him *Mister Dynamite*" It has been a struggle to lay hands on Verckys, although the man doesn´t go unnoticed. Notorious for being one of Congo´s most ruthless business men, the legendary musician had build a whole imperium in Kinshasa, the capital city of the central african power house (arguably one of the toughest places in the world) and has a whole building with his name, in the very heart of the city. So I travelled to the Congo in June of 2013 to find Verckys only to find out that he headed in opposite direction to sort out his health issues. But I did meet his manager who gave me his phone number, so I called:
 "Oh Monsieur Samy, we need to met, lets talk business", he said, probably not knowing that I was an independent record label, with all it represents. 
But the more I spoke to the men the more I realised that he was genuinely interested in music more then anything else. The following message I received few weeks ago, confirmed my feeling: "Samy, I am writing to you because I´m a little worried. I´ve been thinking about your selection and I now wonder if your compilation will do well due to the fact that the chosen songs had little impact in Kinshasa. Others had much more success" I was surprised but pleased to see that he cared about the project although I had already paid him in full. But why wouldn't he? Its his music after all. "Most of the songs you´ve selected were recorded in Nairobi, for the Kenyan market. These songs did very well there, also in Zambia, but here in the Congo they flopped...except for "Ya Nini", that was a monster hit. Still, I am very surprised you´ve mentioned it has become a legendary track in Colombia, positively surprised" This compilation was supposed to be released in October as a limited edition of 2000 copies, but after a few Skype chats with Verckys, seeing that he has come to terms with his health issues, and pushing for a European tour come next summer, we´ve decided to release this as Analog Africa No.17 which is now going to see light of day first week of December. In the mean time enjoy this incredible slice of "Congolese AfroFunk", probably one of the best coming out of the continent. "Cheka Sana" has become one of the most sought after 7inch singles around (the B side is killer as well). Collectors and diggers offering crazy sums for it (I don't even dare to mention the sum here). It deserves to be heard by more then just a handful....and it should set fire to many dancefloors around the globe. Be so kind and leave a comment in the soundcloud. I will forward all of them to Verckys himself as an encouragements to come back stronger !!! Thank you for reading. Samy (Analog Africa)

nothing at of , which is


10. Dia Ja Manche - Dionisio Maio (Leave a comment for Dionisio, tell him how much you love his song !)

Dia Ja Manche  - Dionisio Maio (Leave a comment for Dionisio, tell him how much you love his song !)

Space Echo - The mystery behind the Cosmic Sound of Cabo Verde finally revealed! In the spring of 1968 a cargo ship was getting ready to leave the port of Baltimore with an important shipment of musical instruments. Its final destination was Rio De Janeiro, where the EMSE Exhibition (Exposição Mundial Do Son Eletrônico) was going to be held. It was the first expo of its kind to take place in the southern hemisphere and many of the leading companies in the field of electronic music were involved. Rhodes, Moog, Farfisa, Hammond and Korg, just to name a few, were all eager to present their newest synthesisers and other gadgets to a growing and promising South American market, spearheaded by Brazil and Colombia. The ship with the goods set sail on the 20th of March on a very calm morning and disappeared from the radar on the very same day. One can only imagine the surprise of the villagers of Cachaço, on the Sao Nicolau island of Cabo Verde, when a few months later they woke up and found a ship stranded in their fields, in the middle of nowhere, 8 km from the sea. After consulting with the village elders, the locals had decided to open the containers to see what was inside but the news had travelled fast and before they knew it, colonial police had already arrived and secured the area. Portuguese scientists and physicians were ordered to the scene; and after weeks of thorough studies and research, it was concluded that the ship had fallen from the sky. One of the less plausible theories was that it might have fallen from a Russian military air carrier. The locals joked that the government had wasted their tax money again on a useless exercise, as a simple look at the crater generated by the impact could explain the phenomena. “No need for Portuguese rocket science to explain this!” they laughed. What the villagers didn’t know, was that traces of cosmic particles were discovered on the boat. The bow of the ship showed traces of extreme heat, very similar to traces found on meteors, suggesting that the ship had penetrated the hemisphere at high speed. That theory also didn't make sense as such an impact would have reduced the ship to dust. Mystery penetrated the event. Finally, a team of welders arrived to open the containers and the whole village waited impatiently. The atmosphere, which had been filled with joy and excitement, quickly gave way to astonishment. Hundreds of boxes conjured, all containing keyboards and other instruments which they had never seen before: and all useless in an area devoid of electricity. Disappointment was palpable. The goods were temporarily stored in the local church and the women of the village had insisted a solution be found before Sunday mass. It is said that charismatic anti-colonial leader Amílcar Cabral had ordered for the instruments to be distributed equally in places that had access to electricity, which placed them mainly in schools. This distribution was best thing that could have happened - keyboards found fertile grounds in the hands of curious children, born with an innate sense of rhythm and these children picked up instruments that were easy to use and would become instrumental for modernising local rhythms such as Mornas, Coladeras and the highly danceable music style called Funaná, banned by the Portuguese colonial rulers until 1975 probably due to the fact that it was too sexy! Observation was made that the children who came into contact with the instruments found on the ship had prodigious capabilities to understand music and learn instruments. One of them was the musical genius Paulino Vieira who by the end of the 70s would become the country´s most important music arranger. 8 out of the 15 songs presented in this compilation had been recorded with the backing of the band Voz de Cabo Verde lead by Paulino Vieira, the mastermind behind the creation and the promulgation of what is known today as “The Cosmic Sound of Cabo Verde”.

nothing at of , which is


11. Senhor Doutor - Quim Manuel O Espirito Santo

Senhor Doutor - Quim Manuel O Espirito Santo

Analog Africa No.15 – ANGOLA SOUNDTRACK 2 *Hypnosis, Distortions & Other Sonic Innovations 1969-1978* Catalogue No. AACD 075 (1xCD)/AALP 075 (2xLP) CD with 44-Page Booklet / LP with 16-Page LP Size Booklet In 2010, against all odds, Angola Soundtrack Vol.1 was awarded the German Record Critics’ Prize in the category "Black music". This victory was all the sweeter for its triumph over the predicted winner, Aloe Blacc´s multi platinium record, "Good Things". Many were surprised that the award was handed to a compilation that covered obscure music, but it didn’t surprise the team behind Analog Africa who believed such award should have come much earlier. Since discovering the music of Angola 15 years ago, styles such Kazucuta, Rebita and Semba have become an addiction for Samy Ben Redjeb, the compiler, who proclaimed a serious warning in the first edition liner notes: "Listening to these tracks may cause addiction and provoke heavy rotation!" The unique blend of incomparable musicianship, passionate delivery and regional rhythms that make these tracks so combustible are no accident. An exceptional set of circumstances existed in the history of Angola before Independence that created the giant leap in the style and standard of bands and recordings of the time. When Portuguese repressive measures prevented the small Turmas, street musician groups, from being able to perform in Carnaval celebrations in 1961, a Portuguese civil servant, entrepreneur and Angolan music fan named Luis Montês was already in a position to capitalise on Luanda’s need for a live music scene. His self-designed “Kutonocas”, Sunday afternoon live music festivals, delighted a Luandan population hungry for a communication between the city and musseques (townships). It also forced groups to adapt to a different style of playing that would accommodate large stages and broader audiences. They equipped themselves with electric guitars, and fed on the musical influences from Cape Verde, Congo and the Dominican Republic, while staying patriotically true to their own musical legacy and unique rhythms. The intimacy of those participating in this musical revolution meant they playfully and professionally wanted to trump each other’s style; communication between the groups was frequent as everyone studied each other’s records and concerts and players were under a lot of pressure to outdo each other due to the limited recording and performing opportunities. Development of skill and ingenuity was a must, as well as addressing the highly politicised climate. The optimism of Independence can be heard in these recordings; a common goal between the audience and musicians. Upon reading the characteristically generous liner notes of this new Analog Africa release, you will be given more hints of the crucial melting pot that allowed this short period to have such an outstanding productivity. Featuring 44 pages acquired in coordination with the National Library of Luanda and the art magazine “Note E Dia”, Analog Africa head honcho Samy Ben Redjeb has managed to collect newspaper clips, extremely rare pictures of the bands on stage and printed interviews from the 70s. The stunning pages of passionate photography and artistic design also include interviews with many of the original artists and their families, biographies of the three labels that made it all possible, and of Luis Montês, who was the pulse of the live music scene in Luanda. This compilation represents the best of the short lived recording industry in Angola, a brief moment of history between 1969 and 1978, when three recording companies produced approximately 800 limited records, mostly singles. They are rare jewels, each song with a significant story and feel behind it. You will hear exciting music blazed with the anticipation of emancipation, tracks fuelled with a sense of unity, community, importance and immediacy. This addictive, outlawed music from Angola shakes and grooves with the smoothness of staccato machine gun fire. Do yourself a favor and submerge yourself into some of the most the addictive music created by mankind!

nothing at of , which is


12. Avante Juventude - Os Anjos

Avante Juventude - Os Anjos

Analog Africa No.15 – ANGOLA SOUNDTRACK 2 *Hypnosis, Distortions & Other Sonic Innovations 1969-1978* Catalogue No. AACD 075 (1xCD)/AALP 075 (2xLP) CD with 44-Page Booklet / LP with 16-Page LP Size Booklet In 2010, against all odds, Angola Soundtrack Vol.1 was awarded the German Record Critics’ Prize in the category "Black music". This victory was all the sweeter for its triumph over the predicted winner, Aloe Blacc´s multi platinium record, "Good Things". Many were surprised that the award was handed to a compilation that covered obscure music, but it didn’t surprise the team behind Analog Africa who believed such award should have come much earlier. Since discovering the music of Angola 15 years ago, styles such Kazucuta, Rebita and Semba have become an addiction for Samy Ben Redjeb, the compiler, who proclaimed a serious warning in the first edition liner notes:
 "Listening to these tracks may cause addiction and provoke heavy rotation!" The unique blend of incomparable musicianship, passionate delivery and regional rhythms that make these tracks so combustible are no accident.  An exceptional set of circumstances existed in the history of Angola before Independence that created the giant leap in the style and standard of bands and recordings of the time. When Portuguese repressive measures prevented the small Turmas, street musician groups, from being able to perform in Carnaval celebrations in 1961, a Portuguese civil servant, entrepreneur and Angolan music fan named Luis Montês was already in a position to capitalise on Luanda’s need for a live music scene. His self-designed “Kutonocas”, Sunday afternoon live music festivals, delighted a Luandan population hungry for a communication between the city and musseques (townships). It also forced groups to adapt to a different style of playing that would accommodate large stages and broader audiences. They equipped themselves with electric guitars, and fed on the musical influences from Cape Verde, Congo and the Dominican Republic, while staying patriotically true to their own musical legacy and unique rhythms.  The intimacy of those participating in this musical revolution meant they playfully and professionally wanted to trump each other’s style; communication between the groups was frequent as everyone studied each other’s records and concerts and players were under a lot of pressure to outdo each other due to the limited recording and performing opportunities.  Development of skill and ingenuity was a must, as well as addressing the highly politicised climate.  The optimism of Independence can be heard in these recordings; a common goal between the audience and musicians. Upon reading the characteristically generous liner notes of this new Analog Africa release, you will be given more hints of the crucial melting pot that allowed this short period to have such an outstanding productivity.  Featuring 44 pages acquired in coordination with the National Library of Luanda and the art magazine “Note E Dia”, Analog Africa head honcho Samy Ben Redjeb has managed to collect newspaper clips, extremely rare pictures of the bands on stage and printed interviews from the 70s. The stunning pages of passionate photography and artistic design also include interviews with many of the original artists and their families, biographies of the three labels that made it all possible, and of Luis Montês, who was the pulse of the live music scene in Luanda. This compilation represents the best of the short lived recording industry in Angola, a brief moment of history between 1969 and 1978, when three recording companies produced approximately 800 limited records, mostly singles. They are rare jewels, each song with a significant story and feel behind it. You will hear exciting music blazed with the anticipation of emancipation, tracks fuelled with a sense of unity, community, importance and immediacy. This addictive, outlawed music from Angola shakes and grooves with the smoothness of staccato machine gun fire.  Do yourself a favor and submerge yourself into some of the most the addictive music created by mankind!

nothing at of , which is


13. Mingau de Açai - Mestre Cupijo (OUT NOW)

Mingau de Açai - Mestre Cupijo (OUT NOW)

Cametá, a historical little Amazonian town on the shores of the river Tocantins, is the birthplace of the scorching music known as “Siriá”; a cross pollination between the music of the inhabitants of the quilombos, a Brazilian hinterland settlement founded by escaped slaves of African origins, and the indigenous people of the Amazon rainforest. It is a breathing, pulsing, emphatic beat, and the modernised version of this local music, created by Mestre Cupijó, has been igniting street parties and traditional festivals across the state of Pará in Northern Brazil for decades. And at last in 2014, the combustible sound of Siriá will be celebrated internationally as the feverish, tropical sound of the summer! Foretelling his talent to flow between cultures, Cupijó was named after a local river when he was born in 1936, into a family of musicians. His father, Mestre Vicente Castro, was also known as Mestre Sicudera, the musical director of Centennial Euterpe, one of Brazil ́s oldest bands, founded in 1874. At 12, Cupijó started to play the clarinet. He also became proficient at the piano, mandolin and guitar, although the instrument that came to personify his sound was the alto saxophone. Waltz, bolero, cha cha cha and an assortment of dance hall music became part of Cupijó's repertoire, but it was Carimbó and Siriá, the music played by the black communities of Pará, that had the strongest impact on the young musician. To grasp the soul of this music, Cupijó went to its source and lived with the quilombolas (maroon) community of the Amazon. Upon his return, enriched by this life-changing experience, he founded the band "Jazz Orquestra os Azes do Ritmo" with the goal of reinventing Siriá and modernising Samba de Cacete, Banguê and other folkloric music of the state of Pará. Airwaves from the Caribbean and Latin America had also brought the cumbia sound of the mighty Colombian orchestras, Merengue from the Dominican republic and Cuban music to the Amazon, all of which had an impact on the music of Northern Brazil, Mambo especially! Mestre Cupijó took these influences and mixed them in with the ingredients he had studied in the Quilombos. That fusion – as we are witnessing on this record – had explosive effects. His fresh new sound became the soundtrack to Cametá's legendary Carnival and soon his troupe were invited to other festivals along the river. Transportation to these concerts was via small boats, where three or four musicians would share a vessel with their instruments tucked between their legs. In those days there were no posters or radio adverts to promote the shows in any way, yet Cupijó’s shows became notorious. In an interview one of his band members explains: "Whenever there was a party – on a Saturday for example – and it was known that Mestre Cupijó would play, the news would spread incredibly fast, just by word of mouth. We didn’t understand how that was possible, but it certainly was amazing." After the initial wave of enthusiasm, the first two LPs were recorded with rudimentary equipment in a dance club in Cametá. However, it was the third attempt, recorded in a studio in Belém, which would trigger a phenomenal success. "Caboclinha Do Igapo" and "Mambo do Martela", included on this record, became instant hits. A year later, "Mingau de Açai", one of Cupijo ́s most popular tunes, took the region by storm. In total six LPs were recorded by Mestre Cupijó. He then created "Concurso de Musicas Carnavalesco de Compositores Cametaenses”, a contest for carnival music composers. The songs composed expressly for these contests in the 70s are still performed today during carnival season. In addition to evolving the Pará music culture in this way, he also owned a makeshift soundsystem, "Musicolor", to spin the discs of local artists before his own shows to the frenzied crowds. Mestre Cupijó proved himself a philanthropist as well as a conductor for the people’s music, and acted as a provisional lawyer for the city of Cametá, specialising in help for the poor. He also had a short spell in politics and was elected by a vast majority to the station of Municipal Councillor of Cametá. Master Cupjó, the pillar of Pará's festive culture, and a humble pop icon who was ushered prominently into the country’s history books, passed away on 25 September 2012, at the age of 76. We at Analog Africa are ferociously proud and honoured to have the chance to present these carefully selected tracks from Mestre Cupijó’s six studio albums. We hope that his music captivates you with the magic and bewilderment that is has us. We recognise his compositions as true anthems of life and vitality, vibrantly encouraging all to drink and dance until sunrise! Let go of your inhibitions and immerse yourself in the wonderful world of Mestre Cupijó........ Segura!!!

nothing at of , which is



15. Semba Avo - Urbano de Castro (Taken from the 1st LP recorded and pressed in Angola - 1973)

Semba Avo - Urbano de Castro (Taken from the 1st LP recorded and pressed in Angola - 1973)

Analog Africa Limited Dance Edition No.4 (AADE 04) 1st Long Play recorded and pressed in Angola in 1973 (strictly limited to 1000 copies - 180gr) Release Date 29th of October It is with a great sense of privilege that Analog Africa presents this holy grail of Angolan popular urban music. Produced by FADIANG (Fabrica de Discos Angolana) this LP, known by music aficionados as “Rebita 74”, is the 1st LP to be recorded and pressed on Angolan soil. Released in 1973, this album is in fact a compilation of tracks by Urbano de Castro, Os Kiezos and Jovens do Prenda, the best selling artists at that particular time, who were asked to compose four songs each, exclusively for this project. The result is a masterpiece - one of the best LP recorded in Angola.

nothing at of , which is


16. Analog Africa Selection Vol.2 (2009) - Download it, Share it & make sure your friends hear it ....

Analog Africa Selection Vol.2 (2009) - Download it, Share it & make sure your friends hear it ....

This mix was originally done for The Wire Magazine Website. But not only did I want to avoid the mix getting lost in "the universe of data" after it has been remove from the Wire's front page but more importantly I wanted you guys, who have been so supportive of my label, to enjoy it as well. The week I was about to finish the mix I got a message from Julien from www.parisdjs.com one of Europe´s best website when it comes to sharing our passion for worldwide dancefloor oriented music, asking me if I would like to send him a Mix for his site. So I wrote to the Wire to make sure all is cool and we agreed that they will have it for a week exclusively and that Julien and myself will make it available later. The Wire kindly offered to pay me for the mix but I thought it would be fair to decline the offer. The initial idea was to make a pure West African Afro-beat/Afro-Funk mix, as I guessed they wanted something that reflected what I was releasing but then, while selecting the tracks, I bumped into few titles from Ethiopia, Angola and Guinea that I have been enjoying a lot in recent months and decided to add them as well. This mix is (was) also an occasion to celebrate "the Vodoun Effect" Compilation by Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou which has been released in France today and will be available in the rest of Europe and in the USA at the end of November. The mix contains a slower version of the Poly-Rythmo killer track "Se Tche We Djo Mon" I hope you´ll enjoy it !!! Samy

nothing at of , which is


17. Analog Africa Selection Vol.1 (2008) - Download it, Share it & make sure your friends hear it ....

Analog Africa Selection Vol.1 (2008) - Download it, Share it & make sure your friends hear it ....

This is a mix I´ve made in 2008 to celebrate the release of my 3rd compilation "African Scream Contest". At the time I was told that this selection had reached cult status after being downloaded a few thousand times on the formidable PARIS DJs platform. But, to the surprise of many, few billion people seemed to have missed it, so here it is again!!! Download it, enjoy it, press the repeat button, get addicted, share it……spread the word about our label!

nothing at of , which is


18. AJA WONDO - Uppers International

AJA WONDO - Uppers International

From the compilation: Afrobeat Airways 2 - Return Flight to Ghana 1974-1983 Release Date: September 17th, 2013 (click below for promotional pictures and additonal information) http://bit.ly/15AR6bg From the coastal cities of Accra and Cape Coast, basked in a tropical sound heavily influenced by highlife, to the semi-Saharan cities of Tamalé and Bolgatanga (part of a self-proclaimed ‘Islamic Funk Belt’) via the central city of Kumasi, Analog Africa (http://analogafrica.blogspot.com/) has criss-crossed Ghana in search of rare tracks, part of its ongoing, hard-grooving mission to bring the soul, funk, and vintage local pop out of obscurity and into its deserved international place. Building on the success of the first installment in 2009, Afrobeat Airways 2 (Analog Africa; release: September 17, 2013) is a selection of 13 ultra-rare tracks by some of the musical giants who had created a movement that rocked the West African nation throughout the ‘70s: legendary singer K. Frimpong; Nana Ampedu (leader of the mighty African Brothers Band); Gyedu-Blay Ambolley and his superb guest appearance with The Complex Sounds; afrobeat star Ebo Taylor, backing his son in an unreleased track called ‘Children Don’t Cry’; the enigmatic Rob and his unique blend of twisted afrofunk; innovative drummer De Frank; and Uppers International, with their raw Islamic funk style. More obscure artists such as Los Issufu and his Moslems, Waza Afrika 76 and Tony Sarfo and his Funky Afrosibi make northern hemisphere debuts, adding to a rich list of Ghanaian artists whose music could be transferred seamlessly to any dancefloor in the world. As with all Analog Africa releases, this is about more than just the sounds. It’s about the place, time, and people who shaped the scene. To document this, the accompanying 44-page booklet of Afrobeat Airways 2 features an introductory essay written by Afropop Worldwide editor Banning Eyre, exploring the development of soul, funk and afrobeat during the ‘60s and ‘70s in Ghana. The remaining 30 pages are packed with interviews and biographies of the artists and producers involved in the creation of this wonderful music. Additionally, the Analog Africa team have managed to track down the photographers of the famous Modern Photo studios, located at the front of Accra’s legendary TipToe, a venue notorious for organizing unforgettable dance competitions, ‘Miss Tip Toe’ contests and the most in-demand highlife and afrobeat gigs of the day. 400 negatives have been lent to the Analog Africa team. Samy Ben Redjeb selected 50 of the most expressive pictures to document this little-known but striking musical scene.

nothing at of , which is


19. Salamouti - Amara Touré et l´Orchestre Massako

Salamouti  - Amara Touré et l´Orchestre Massako

June 23rd marks the arrival of the long-awaited proper reissue of Amara Toure’s groundbreaking Afro-latin studio works captured between 1973 and 1980. Analog Africa has prepared a special gatefold double LP version on 140g vinyl, encompassing the three singles he recorded under the Black and White ensemble between 1973 and 1976 along with the highly coveted Orchestre Massako group’s stunning 1980 LP Accompagné Par L’Orchestre Massako. This is the entire known works of the mystic composer and it is stated in the press that after he recorded Accompagné Par L’Orchestre Massako, he would never been seen again and his whereabouts are unknown to this day. Breaking ground out of the rich legacy and musician development system Dakar, Senegal, producer Ibra Kasseì created, the origins of Ibra’s movement begins in the late ’50s when fusion music around the world was beginning to stretch outside of sketch forms. Cuban styles of son montuno and patchanga were infused with local folk traditions and modern instrumentation of each successive generation, producing a hybrid of West African and Caribbean music that is intoxicating and hypnotic in every rhythm, harmony and overtone. Senegal was buzzing with new creativity through the ’60s and beyond, met with an array of highly advanced musicians and visionaries. Nightlife music for those that wanted something beyond the radio hits and presented with a passionate essence that connected many people in the region of the time. Amara Toure was brought up in a progressive movement unlike any other and by the time he was able to head his own groups and record his own content from the experience he gained networking with Ibra Kassei, African music had finally hit a global scale. When you open up the lid on the musicians who never made it outside of the regions known for strong music activity, an overwhelming list of artists come up and there is no question that Amara Toure ranks amongst the top of these creators. Originally from Guinea-Conakry, Amara Toure remained underground and raw during his tenure producing records, creating some of the most earth-shattering grooves and harmonies from any West African artist ever. To have his works in one album from the exceptional team at Analog Africa is a dream come true, updating pre-existing copies of originals that run in the triple digit numbers amongst hardcore collectors and doing a great job at preserving the analog warmth of the originals. The singles material was recorded in Cameroon while the 1980 content was done in Libreville, Gabon. Absolutely breathtaking guitar, percussion and horn heavy music that is timeless without question. For the vinyl junkies, this one has been pressed on deluxe gatefold double LP as a 140-gram vinyl and is presented in four-color screenprinted covers and also comes with a screenprinted poster. Limited edition to 1,500 copies, so order now if you want to secure a vinyl copy as these will surely run out quickly. Analog Africa does various reprints on back catalog titles out of print but these are never announced ahead of time. One can only hope they will run multiple campaigns for these prints as this music is too good for words.

nothing at of , which is


20. Bitori - Bitori Nha Bibinha (Leave a comment for Victor Tavares aka "Bitori"....we will forward)

Bitori - Bitori Nha Bibinha (Leave a comment for Victor Tavares aka

https://analogafrica.bandcamp.com/album/legend-of-funana-the-forbidden-music-of-the-cape-verde-islands It is 1997. A quiet, unassuming man of 59 years old named Victor Tavares - better know as Bitori - walks into a recording studio for the first time. The result is a musical masterpiece - a recording which many consider to be the best Funaná album ever made. Bitori´s musical adventure had begun long before this point. It was 1954 when he embarked on a journey across the seas to the island of Sao Tomé & Principe. The young man´s hope was to return to Cabo Verde with an accordion. Following two years of hard labour Bitori had succeeded in saving enough money to acquire what was to become his most valued possession, his cherished instrument. The two month journey back to Santiago, his island of birth, proved time enough to master it. Self taught, Bitori developed his own style, an infectious blaze, that quickly caught the attention of the older generation. Before long Bitori was being asked to share his musical talents, igniting the local festivities around Praia with his music. But not everybody welcomed the rural accordion-based sound. Perceived as a symbol of the struggle for Cape Verdean independence and frowned upon as music of uneducated peasants, Funaná was prohibited by the Portuguese colonial rulers. Performing it in public or in urban centres had serious consequences - often jail time and torture awaited musicians that were “caught in the act”. In light of such persecution the genre of Funaná began to slowly disappear. In 1975 Cabo Verde achieved independence from Portuguese colonial rule. Along with Cabo Verde’s independence came a lifting of the ban placed on Funaná. The musical repercussions in Cabo Verde were plenty - many upcoming artists embraced Funaná, translating and adapting its musical form in new ways. It was not to be until the mid-1990’s, however, that Funaná in its traditional form was actually recorded. It was a young singer from Tarafal, Chando Graciosa, who was to play a key role in this event. Upon hearing Bitori, Graciosa immediately felt drawn to Bitori's unique playing style - a raw and passionate sound accompanied by honest lyrics that reflected the harsh reality of the Cabo Verdean working class. He eagerly approached Bitori suggesting they join forces and travel overseas with the objective of taking Funaná beyond its rural roots. The two of them, with others in tow, achieved their goal and travelled to Europe, introducing a receptive European audience to the vibrant energy of Funaná. Eventually Bitori returned to his beloved Cabo Verde. Graciosa opted to settle in Rotterdam in order to pursue his career - he vowed, however, to bring Bitori across to Holland at a later date to record an album. In 1997 the time was ripe to immortalise the sound Bitori had shaped over a time span of four decades. Built around a formidable rhythm section, formed of drummer Grace Evora and bass player Danilo Tavares, "Bitori Nha Bibinha" was recorded. The recording catapulted Chando Graciosa to stardom, making him Cabo Verde´s No.1 interpreter of Funaná. The success in Cabo Verde was phenomenal and Funaná rapidly gained the recognition it deserved, especially in urban dance clubs. Bitori´s songs quickly became standards - classics known and loved throughout the country. The musical success, however, was solely limited to the Cabo Verdean islands - until now! Analog Africa is proud to contribute to the worldwide promotion of Funaná - the once forbidden sound of the Cabo Verde archipelago - by releasing a worldwide re-issue of Bitori and Chando Graciosa´s legendary recording. The release will herald Bitori´s first European Tour taking place during the summer of 2016. Watch this space! And listen!

nothing at of , which is